Category Archives for "Webinars"

How to Promote A Webinar Using Facebook Ads

Webinar

Can Facebook advertising help your webinar audience grow?

Many businesses love a webinar as a way to add value, nurture prospects and close sales. 

Webinars work well... as long as you can drive traffic to the webinar.

Facebook ads are a great way to get prospects over to the presentation. If done right, ads can be very cost effective, making the webinar a profitable promotion.

However, if done incorrectly, the cost per lead could skyrocket, leading to taking a loss on the webinar.

Let’s dive into Marigold’s proven strategy for promoting these events using Facebook ads.

Phase 1: Build A Webinar Audience

This first step is an often overlooked, but very important step.

We’ve already explained that warm audiences covert at a higher rate and for a lower cost, than cold audiences do.

So, if you market your webinar to a warm audience, you’ll pay less and get more signups than if you market to a cold audience.

Start this phase early. Building a warm audience is an ongoing process. It’s like building an email list, or website traffic… you shouldn’t wait until you have something to sell to get started.

The ads sent out in this phase don’t need a call to action or an “ask.” Instead, lead the readers to blog posts, videos, podcasts, interviews, or just Facebook posts that your audience will enjoy and get value from.

Phase 2: Send Traffic To A Webinar Landing Page

Now that there’s a warm audience in place, it’s time to send out the opt-in offer.

The ads in this phase will drive traffic to the landing page. We’ve found that sticking to the basic ad format (text with one image) works well to entice a click and ultimately get conversions.

Unlike the ads in phase 1, these ads should include a call to action. The goal is to get the prospects over to the landing page and excited to sign up for the training.

Best Practices:

It’s always best to test, but here is what we suggest for best results.

First, always test multiple ad images. Choose images that stand out in the news feed and include text that is easy to read. Select a strong font that can be seen easily on both mobile and desktop.

[Here’s a quick article on how to create high converting images, even if you’re not a designer.]

Next, keep headlines short (4-6 words work well). Headlines should clearly state the benefit that the user will get from signing up.

To appeal to a variety of people, include a link in the body of the text. This way, readers can click on that link, or on the ad image itself.

Keep the call to action clear but friendly. We’ve found the “learn more” button to work well and not sound too demanding or committal.

Phase 3: Send Traffic to Sales Page

Assuming there is an offering at the end of the webinar, you’ll want to continue to drive traffic back to the sales page.

That is the goal of phase 3.

Through targeting, you can choose to show these ads only to those who have attended the webinar, or a wider audience.

Best Practices:

Like phase 2, create an ad with text and one image to drive traffic back to the sales page.

Create a clear call to action. Use images and copy similar to that used in phase 2 with some slight changes so the ads stand out.

Natural urgency (such as “doors closing at midnight” or “offer ends in 48 hours”) helps push those on the fence over the edge.

A large portion of sales typically comes toward the end of the campaign, right before the deadline. Don’t be afraid to create ads that specifically focus on this urgency and run them only at the appropriate time (example, ads that mention ending in 3 days, 2 days, tonight, etc.).

That’s it!

You’re all set to create a warm audience, drive traffic to the webinar registration page, and later to the sales page.

Remember, start building the warm audience early! A large warm pool of prospects will help get your webinar (and any future promotion) off to a great start!

In the meantime, why not find out what the “7 biggest mistakes you’re making with your Facebook Ads are”, and how to fix them: